How to get the most out of strawberries and cream: Wimbledon edition

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By Cecelia Quant, First year, English

Henman Hill, jugs of Pimm’s and players dressed all in white; all iconic traditions of the Championships but perhaps none more so than Wimbledon’s infamous strawberries and cream. Though obviously a classic summer pairing, I wanted to see what other recipes strawberries and cream could inspire.

Strawberry Fields Cocktail

The idea of cream in a cocktail felt a bit too heavy for a summer cocktail so this takes inspiration from a whiskey sour, using the foaming properties of egg white to create a cocktail with a creamy texture that doesn’t leave you needing a nap after one sip.

Strawberry fields cocktail | Epigram / Cecilia Quant

Serves 1

5 strawberries, halved

45ml vodka

20ml lemon juice, freshly squeezed

15ml simple syrup

1 egg, egg white separated

1 strawberry (for garnish)

Black pepper, to taste

1.      To a cocktail shaker, add the halved strawberries and muddle to crush the fruit.

2.      Add the vodka, lemon juice, simple syrup and egg white and shake with ice.

3.      Strain back into the shaker and discard the ice. Dry shake (without ice) and strain into a stemmed cocktail glass. Leave it to settle for a minute or so to allow the egg white to create a creamy layer on the surface of the drink.

4.      Garnish with a strawberry and a crack of black pepper.

Balsamic Strawberry and Goat’s Cheese Bruschetta

One of my favourite summer dishes, Italian bruschetta, is traditionally made with tomatoes and garlic, but this version balances the sweetness of strawberries and balsamic vinegar with the creaminess of goat’s cheese to create a perfect light summer snack. Don’t skimp on the cheese and make sure to get a nice char on the toast for the perfect crunch.

Balsamic strawberry and goats cheese bruschetta | Epigram / Cecilia Quant 

Serves 4

400g strawberries, diced

150g soft goat’s cheese

4 slices of crusty bread

2tsp balsamic vinegar

1 ½tbsp olive oil

5 sprigs of thyme, leaves roughly chopped

5 basil leaves, sliced into ribbons

Salt and black pepper to taste

1.      Combine the diced strawberries, balsamic vinegar, olive oil and thyme in a mixing bowl and season to taste with salt and black pepper.

2.      Pop the slices of bread into a toaster until a nice, golden brown colour.

3.      Spread a generous layer of goat’s cheese onto the toasted bread then spoon the marinated strawberries on top.

4.      Scatter over the ribbons of basil and serve with a final drizzle of olive oil and some cracked black pepper.

Vanilla Panna Cotta with Strawberry Coulis

Strawberries and cream in (nearly) its purest form. This dessert tastes like the filling of a loaded scone – if that’s your cup of tea. Super easy and a perfect way to use up those ‘Gü’ ramekins lurking at the back of a cupboard which you kept because they ‘might come in useful at some point’.

Serves 4

300ml double cream

250ml milk

60g caster sugar

2 ½ sheets gelatine

1 vanilla pod, split in half, or 1tsp vanilla essence

100g strawberries, roughly chopped

2tbsp caster sugar

1 lemon, juiced

1.      Soak the gelatine sheets in a bowl of cold water for ten minutes.

2.      Combine the cream, milk, sugar and vanilla into a medium saucepan and set over a medium-low heat, bring to a simmer, stirring occasionally.

3.      Once simmering, remove the pan from the heat. Squeeze the excess water out of the gelatine sheets and add to the cream mixture, whisking to combine.

4.      In four small ramekins, pour in the panna cotta mixture and place in the fridge to set for at least four hours.

5.      To make the coulis, combine the strawberries, lemon juice, 2tbsp of caster sugar and 1tbsp of water in a small saucepan and simmer for ten minutes. With a potato masher or a hand blender (if you have one), blend the mixture into a smooth consistency and set aside to cool.

6.      To serve, run a knife around the edge of the ramekin to release and turn out onto a plate. Garnish with a spoonful of coulis and a strawberry sliced in half through the stem.


Featured Image: Epigram / Bea Allan

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