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Bristol science centre At-Bristol is renamed as We the Curious after being given £3 million in funding from the Government, for the first time since it was opened.

Situated in Millennium Square, The At-Bristol Science Centre for many years has been the go-to destination for students of both primary school and University alike – yet no more. This Autumn after 17 years under its current pseudonym, At-Bristol is transforming to We the Curious. Over the next two years, everything from the Café to the signage, even the overall vision of the centre will be shifting. In their own words from their website: ‘Science will absolutely still be at the core of what we do, and with our new vision to create a culture of curiosity we are not just aiming for more people to access science but to completely shift how people see it. It is messy, creative, collaborative, living and for everyone – an integral part of culture.’

The project is backed by £3 million pounds. This money is jointly funded by BEIS (Department for Business Energy & Industrial Strategy) as well as the Wellcome Trust. This year the trust donated a total of £13 million to science centres across the UK in locations such as Belfast and Aberdeen. The trust is a global charitable foundation that aims to improve global health through targeted investment in science. In the coming five years they ‘aim to spend up to £5 billion helping thousands of curious, passionate people all over the world.’

students can get involved in everything from the live floor over the holidays to school workshops covering a range of curriculum-based science subjects

The transformation looks to create a plethora of new exhibits and opportunities. The centre is reacting to the feedback they received in the 2015/16 period to make their Science exhibits ‘more challenging’. A few of the highlights of what is to come from the scheme include ‘Open city lab’, a real working lab where anyone can get involved. The interactive experience ‘The Wall of Everything’, which explores the results of scientific advancement as a consequence of curiosity. Finally, ‘The Theatre of Curiosity’, a space for the exploration of the intricacies of the Scientific method and how it works.

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Regardless of all the alteration, many things continue as normal at the Science centre, including the vast number of opportunities for University students. As freshers draws to a close, students, those of science subjects, in particular, may want to think about viewing, visiting and even volunteering at the Museum. While the museum aims much of its content at a lower age bracket than that of university students, there are still many opportunities well worth the visit down to the harbourside.  The planetarium is no doubt the most attractive of visitor attractions. The museum runs regular shows on topics surrounding space and the solar system. There is also the opportunity to attend an adult only night and CHAOS the physics society last year advertised for a student night to visit the planetarium – keep an eye out if you are an Astro fan.

The other huge area that can be great to get involved with for students is the centre’s volunteering scheme. Through it, students can get involved in everything from the live floor over the holidays to school workshops covering a range of curriculum-based science subjects. The programme runs on a flexible hours system and is open to anyone of a science persuasion. It is a great activity that will certainly add to any science student’s CV, and as a particular deputy editor of this paper can attest, it is a rewarding scheme that can certainly add diversity to any drab weekends.


Are you planning a visit to We the Curious? Let us know!

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