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Jordan Barker gets cosy with Revunions for their last show of the year, written by and starring only women and oppressed genders.

I always feel slightly ill before watching live comedy. I start grinding my teeth, a small sweaty lagoon forms in my palms, and my stomach begins dancing a tango with my intestines. The worry isn’t totally irrational.

I’ve spent many hours watching videos like Stand Up Annihilated by Heckler and Awful Stand Ups get REKT!! (painful to watch)! Part 1. And though I can enjoy these in the comfort of my home, to see a comedian die onstage before my eyes is an unbearable prospect.

Milkshake is Bristol Revunions’ final show of the year, solely written by and starring women and people of oppressed genders. But having the guts to get on stage and perform requires a lot of balls. And being a more or less straight-white-cis-man, I fear I won’t be the best judge. I mean, apart from Kathy Burke, Mae Martin, Sandi Toksvig, Andi Osho, Nina Conti and Sharon Horgan, I can’t think of a single funny woman/gender-oppressed entertainer.

The sketches are consistently funny, diverse and original

So, I buy myself a bev and perch near the back. Let the comedy commence.

It turns out to be a whimsical night. The stand up is mainly observational stuff, from rom-coms to a tale of Love and Piss, cough medicine to RuPaul’s Drag Race, and a meditation on stress-induced wanking. This rumination on masturbation ends with a poem about jerking off over someone who, whilst you weren’t aware of any attraction to them, decided to arise from your subconscious and disrupt you in the act of self-pleasure. It reminded of my all-time favourite poet, Adrian Mole.

I didn’t know mooncups existed before, but I shan’t ever look at the moon or a cup in the same way again.

At one point, the host drags three audience members on stage for a quick game. Each contender is challenged with using a menstruation device, with the chance to win what can only be described as some ungodly fruit based snack bar.

The contestant with the mooncup wins, which surprised me, because I thought the bloke with the sanitary napkin gave a rather convincing performance. Or, um, so I imagine. I didn’t know mooncups existed before, but I shan’t ever look at the moon or a cup in the same way again.

The laughs are aplenty and there’s a warm sense of accomplishment by the end

After a short break, Milkshake begins. The sketches are consistently funny, diverse and original, particularly It’d be rude not to, which I replayed in my mind as I slouched on home. Also, the Carol sketch is a hoot, demonstrating a mastery of deadpan wit. Some sketches are certainly more complete than others, but the comedians nevertheless manage to keep the ball rolling throughout. The laughs are aplenty and there’s a warm sense of accomplishment by the end of the set.

It is a relief when a performance goes well—this is especially true of comedy. Though not every gag is a zinger, the jokes that do fall flat are met with a considerate hush rather than uncomfortable silence. All in all, Revunions’ final show is a resounding success, finishing the year on a well deserved high.

★★★★


What did you think of Revunions’ final evening of zany joke-telling of the year? Let us know in the comments below or on social media

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